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Cellulose for textiles

Wood fibre is well on the way towards becoming an important element of textile production around the world. The technique of manufacturing textiles from wood fibre is not new, but recent developments have resulted in something of a resurgence. Demand for textiles is growing, but the cultivation of cotton (which accounts for the majority of textile raw materials) places considerable strain on the ecosystem. The production of wood fibre for textiles has therefore become a new area of interest for pulp manufacturers.

Textil

New knowledge required

Cellulose is a chemical substance that makes up around half of all solid material in the plant world. It is abundant and renewable, and is therefore an almost inexhaustible raw material resource. Cellulose is thus a potential replacement for many of the finite resources used today.

The paper industry already has superb expertise when it comes to processing trees into fibres that give different types of paper quality. Replacing cotton, for example, as a raw material for textiles requires us to build up new expertise on the production of cellulose fibres with properties other than those required for papermaking. The chemistry of the cellulose has to be mastered so that a highly reactive specialty cellulose can be produced and adapted in line with future applications such as textiles. These processes must also be tailored to suit today's society, with its keen awareness of energy and environmental issues.

Reactive cellulose fibres

A key area of knowledge is reactive cellulose fibre, i.e. plant-based cellulose fibre that is easily converted, for example into threads for manufacturing comfortable fabrics. The starting point for Innventia's work with reactive cellulose is that production must be possible using existing processing equipment. This will allow us to scale up production to commercially viable levels in the future.

 

Specialcellulosa

Contact

Tomas Larsson
+46 8 676 7130
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Publicerat

Concentration enrichment of urea at cellulose surfaces: results from molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy
Bergenstråhle-Wohlert M, Berglund L A, Brady J W, Larsson P T, Westlund P-O, Wohlert J
Cellulose (2012) 19:1–12. DOI 10.1007/s10570-011-9616-x

Compression molded wood pulp biocomposites: a study of hemicellulose influence on cellulose supramolecular structure and material properties
Nilsson H, Galland S, Larsson P T, Gamstedt E K, Iversen T
Cellulose (2012) DOI 10.1007/s10570-012-9688-2

Accessibility, reactivity and supramolecular structure of E.globulus dissolving pulps
Wollboldt R P, Zuckerstatter G, Weber H K, Larsson P T, Sixta H
Wood Sci. Technol. (2010) 44:533–546. DOI 10.1007/s00226-010-0370-2

Controlling cellulose fibril aggregation of Eucalyptus dissolving pulp samples
Chunilall V, Bush T, Larsson P T, Iversen T, Kindness A
Holzforschung 64(2010):6, 693–698, ISSN (Online) 1437-434X, ISSN (Print) 0018-3830, DOI: 10.1515/HF.2010.097, Available online: 29/07/2010, October 2010

The surface structure of well-ordered native cellulose fibrils in contact with water
Malm E, Bulone V, Wickholm K, Larsson P T, Iversen T,
Carbohydrate Research 345 (1) (2010), 97-100

Controlling cellulose fibril aggregation of Eucalyptus dissolving pulp samples
Chunilall V, Bush T, Larsson P T, Iversen T, Kindness A, Holzforschung. 64 (6), 693–698, ISSN (Online) 1437-434X, ISSN (Print) 0018-3830, DOI: 10.1515/HF.2010.097, Available online: 29/07/2010, October 2010